Crochet

What is Fingering Weight Yarn Anyway?

Crochet has had an awakening in recent years, with fingering weight yarn becoming more widely used in stunning patterns. But what the heck is fingering weight yarn anyway? I’m here to tell you all about it!

In this post, learn more about this yarn weight, find value-priced alternatives for the expensive stuff, and get inspired by 16 gorgeous fingering weight crochet patterns.

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Learn about fingering weight yarn for knitting and crochet. Get inspired with crochet project ideas and value yarns for fingering weight shawls, socks, and blankets. |TLYCBlog.com

What is Fingering Weight Yarn?

Fingering weight yarn is the second lightest yarn out of 8 standard yarn weights. Also called superfine, sock, and sometimes baby yarn, fingering weight yarn is just slightly heavier than lace weight yarn and lighter than sport weight yarn.

It has a yarn weight symbol of 1 and can be found in minis (often 20-30 grams), half skeins (about 50g), full skeins (typically 100g), and jumbo skeins (anything over 100g). On average, superfine yarn will have 380-460 yards per 100 grams, with the most common skeins sold in the U.S. being about 400 yards per 100g skein.

Learn about fingering weight yarn for knitting and crochet. Get inspired with crochet project ideas and value yarns for fingering weight shawls, socks, and blankets. |TLYCBlog.com
Loveland Lite, made with 2 skeins of fingering weight yarn.

The fine gauge of fingering weight yarn makes it very versatile and ideal for projects that you want to be detailed without being heavy. Shawls and socks are an obvious choice for superfine yarn, but you can also make delicate blankets and wearables out of lightweight yarn.

If you have yarn on hand that is missing a label, the easy way to find its weight is with the wrap test. The wrap test involves wrapping the yarn around a ruler a number of times. The yarn weight is based on how many times you can wrap the yarn within one inch. For fingering weight yarn, you should get 12-18 wraps per inch. Learn more about the wrap test HERE.

Learn about fingering weight yarn for knitting and crochet. Get inspired with crochet project ideas and value yarns for fingering weight shawls, socks, and blankets. |TLYCBlog.com
Wildbird Shawl, made with fingering weight yarn and mohair held double

Fingering Weight Yarn and Crochet

More and more crocheters are warming up to the idea of finer yarns. With so many fingering weight yarns available commercially and from independent dyers, it’s no surprise that crochet patterns and projects using these yarns are popping up everywhere.

Superfine yarn is a great choice for crocheters for so many reasons. Though crochet is often criticized for the thicker fabric it creates compared to knitting, that same thicker fabric results in a beautiful drape when using a finer yarn. Crochet also works up relatively quickly, allowing you to zoom through a skein of superfine yarn in no time. My favorite feature of fingering weight yarn is that it encourages crocheters to experiment with colors and fibers that are not often advertised to us.

Learn about fingering weight yarn for knitting and crochet. Get inspired with crochet project ideas and value yarns for fingering weight shawls, socks, and blankets. |TLYCBlog.com

16 Fingering Weight Crochet Patterns

Shawls + Wraps – Crochet shawls are an obvious choice for fingering weight yarns. They are great at showing off color, texture, and shape while highlighting the unique features of a yarn.

Clockwise from Top Left: Adventure Shawl, Coles River Kerchief, Despite, and the Flatiron Shawl.

Socks – Believe it or not, crochet socks are a thing! Find a superfine yarn with a touch of nylon in it to make these socks durable and beautiful.

Clockwise from Top Left: Slip Stitch Cuff Socks, Festival Socks, Tadasana Yoga Socks, and Butterfly Socks.

Blankets – Fingering weight blankets make for an unbelievable lightweight fabric that is perfect for any season. Try using mini skeins of yarn for a fun motif pattern.

Clockwise from Top Left: Caramel Whirl Blanket, Battenburg Blanket, Baby Snug, and Medina Mosaic Tiles.

Wearables – Crochet wearables aren’t just for the summer. Using fingering weight yarn means you can sport your crochet tanks, sweaters, and cardigans anytime.

Clockwise from Top Left: Tessellation Tee, Wonder Cardigan, the Honeycomb Tank Top, and the Goldenrod Sweater.

Learn about fingering weight yarn for knitting and crochet. Get inspired with crochet project ideas and value yarns for fingering weight shawls, socks, and blankets. |TLYCBlog.com

Substituting Fingering Weight Yarns

Hand-dyed superfine yarn is all the rage right now. But, what if you don’t want to spend $100+ to make a magnificent sweater? Here are 18 fingering weight alternatives to sub for the pricer hand-dyed yarns.

Not all fingering weight yarns are created equal, so be sure to check your gauge BEFORE starting your project!

NOTE: All prices are regular full price. Click the title links to see if any of these yarns are on sale.

1 – Woolike Yarn by Loops & Threads

Yarn Specs: $3.49 from Michaels; 678 yards/ 100g ball; 85% acrylic and 15% nylon.

2 – Patons Kroy Socks FX Yarn

Yarn Specs: $5.99 from Michaels; 166 yards/ 50g ball; 75% washable wool and 25% nylon.

3 – Red Heart It’s A Wrap Rainbow Yarn

Red Heart It's A Wrap Rainbow Yarn

Yarn Specs: $11.99 from JOANN; 623 yards/ 150g ball; 55% acrylic and 45% cotton.

4 – Lion Brand Summer Nights

Yarn Specs: $6.46 from Lion Brand; 437 yards/ 100g ball; 82% acrylic and 18% polyester.

5 – WeCrochet Comfy Fingering

Product Image

Yarn Specs: $3.99 from WeCrochet; 218 yards/ 50g ball; 75% Pima cotton and 25% acrylic.

6 – WeCrochet Muse Hand Painted Fingering

Yarn Specs: $15.99 from WeCrochet; 423 yards/ 100g hank; 75% superwash merino wool and 25% nylon.

7 – Scheepjes Cotton 8

Yarn Specs: $3.49 from LoveCrafts; 186 yards/ 50g ball; 100% cotton.

8 – Scheepjes Whirl

Yarn Specs: $29.99 from LoveCrafts; 1094 yards/ 224g ball; 60% cotton; 40% acrylic.

9 – Cascade Heritage Solids

Yarn Specs: $10.99 from LoveCrafts; 437 yards/ 100g hank; 75% merino wool; 25% nylon.

10 – Malabrigo Mechita

Yarn Specs: $20 from LoveCrafts; 420 yards/ 100g hank; 100% merino wool.

11 – Premier Wool Free Sock

Yarn Specs: $4.99 from Premier; 235 yards/ 50g ball; 93% acrylic, 7% PBT.

12 – Premier Cotton Collage

Yarn Specs: $4.49 from Premier; 246 yards/ 50g ball; 46% cotton, 33% superwash fine merino, 12% polyamide, 9% PBT.

13 – Sugar Bush Nanaimo Yarn

Yarn Specs: $9.95 from Yarnspirations; 164 yards/ 50g ball; 80% baby alpaca, 20% mulberry silk.

14 – Red Heart It’s A Wrap

Yarn Specs: $9.99 from Yarnspirations; 1100 yards/ 200g cake; 50% cotton, 50% acrylic.

15 – Sugar Bush Drizzle

Yarn Specs: $10.95 from Yarnspirations; 219 yards/ 25g donut; 76% super kid mohair, 24% silk.

16 – Hobbii Universe

Universe Yarn Hobbii

Yarn Specs: $8.99 from Hobbii; 505 yards/ 100g cake; 98% premium acrylic, 2% polyester.

17 – Hobbii baby Cotton Organic

Baby Cotton Organic Yarn Hobbii

Yarn Specs: $4.90 from Hobbii; 186 yards/ 50g ball; 100% Egyptian cotton.

18 – Happy Sheep Magic Sock Wool

Magic Sock Wool Yarn Happy Sheep

Yarn Specs: $10.49 from Hobbii; 437 yards/ 100g donut; 70% superwash wool, 30% polyamide.


I hope this post helps you feel more confident about trying fingering weight yarn and substituting it in your favorite knit and crochet patterns. Have you tried any of the yarns or patterns mentioned here? I’d love to hear about your experience with fingering weight yarn in the comments!


Fingering Weight Yarn Q & A

What is fingering weight yarn?

  • Fingering weight yarn is the name for category 1 yarn. It is slightly heavier than lace and slightly lighter than sport. It is often used for shawls and socks, though you can knit or crochet anything with it.

Can you crochet with light weight yarn?

  • Yes! You can crochet anything with lace, fingering, and sport weight yarns. Popular projects would be socks, shawls, sweaters, and blankets.

What are the different yarn weights?

  • In order from lightest to heaviest, the different yarn weights are 0 – lace, 1 – fingering, 2 – sport, 3 – DK, 4 – worsted, 5 – bulky, 6 – super bulky, and 7 – jumbo.

How do you know what weight yarn to use?

  • Most knit and crochet patterns will tell you the yarn weight and yardage needed for your project. If you are not using a pattern, use the yarn weight you like the most. It is a good idea for beginners to stick with DK weight and worsted weight yarns, as these are easy to find and easy to work with.

What yarn is best for beginner crochet?

  • Beginner crocheters should use DK weight or worsted weight yarns, which are easy to find in big box stores, and easy to use. You can make just about anything with DK and worsted weight yarn, from baby items, to accessories, wearables, and home decor.

What does number 1 yarn mean?

  • Number 1 yarn refers to fingering weight, which is a category of yarn. This yarn is slightly heavier than lace and slightly lighter than sport. It is often used in knitting and crochet to make shawls and socks, though you can make anything with it.
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15 Comments

  • Reply Sheila Haydel

    Excellent blog! thanks, Toni

    March 3, 2021 at 1:50 pm
    • Reply Toni L.

      Thanks so much! I’m really glad you found it valuable 🙂

      March 3, 2021 at 1:57 pm
  • Reply Chelsea

    Such a great article! I’ve got the goldenrod sweater as a WIP and it’s the first fingering weight project I’ve done. I’ll def be looking into the other yarn and pattern suggestions to add to my “to do” projects next!

    March 3, 2021 at 1:57 pm
    • Reply Toni L.

      That’s so awesome to hear! I have the Goldenrod Sweater in my queue of projects that I hope to make soon. Happy stitching!

      March 3, 2021 at 1:58 pm
    • Reply Gloria

      Great article. My first attempt using fingering weight and mohair for the Wildbird Shawl. I’ll be checking out the different substitutions. Thanks again Toni.

      March 3, 2021 at 9:45 pm
  • Reply Carly

    I just learned so much! Thanks for introducing me to the ruler test- my stash also thanks you. I’m really excited to try some finer weight yarns in my price range. Thank you!

    March 3, 2021 at 2:34 pm
  • Reply Aleah

    This is so helpful. Been looking for inexpensive fingering weight. Thank you!

    March 3, 2021 at 4:10 pm
  • Reply Amber Q.

    Great article! I’m a bit intimidated by the light weight yarns, I think I’ll give it a try now. Thank you, Miss Toni!

    March 3, 2021 at 9:18 pm
  • Reply Julia K McLaren

    Thanks for a great article. I see so much hand dyed fingering weight yarn that catches my eye I really appreciate the pattern suggestions.

    March 3, 2021 at 9:22 pm
  • Reply Michele F

    Super helpful post, Toni! Just in time for baby gifts I’m making for kiddos coming this spring and summer. I’m thinking tricolor entrelac for a cute little blanket!

    March 4, 2021 at 12:21 pm
  • Reply Liz T

    Hi Toni! I was gifted two beautiful hand- dyed sock skeins. There is no way on God’s green earth that they’d go together. Any one-skein patterns to suggest, or perhaps tips on how to match expensive yarns with more budget- friendly stuff? Thank you!

    March 11, 2021 at 1:23 pm
    • Reply Toni L.

      Hi darling! The one pattern I have in mind is the Party Punch Shawl (found HERE). There are also some amazing options on Pinterest 🙂

      March 12, 2021 at 1:17 pm
  • Reply Deanna Evans

    Hi Toni, I’ve started the Party PUnch Shawl but have been very frustrated with how loose the middele is and how hard it is to find the correct stitch at the beginning of the row – then I get to the end and the stitch count is short, so have to redo. Any suggestions?

    March 19, 2021 at 5:39 pm
    • Reply Toni L.

      Hi! My recommendation is to try starting your project with a heavier yarn, just to practice and get into the groove of the pattern, When you’re ready, go back to the lighter weight yarn. Hope that helps!

      March 22, 2021 at 11:13 am
  • Reply Melinda

    What a great post! I’ve been playing around with fingering yarn and loving the results. Now I have a whole new list of fun ones to try.

    I’ve used the Hobbii universe for a pattern from the Hobbii site and it turned out really well. However, I’m making a second one with some edits to the pattern (the boat neck wasn’t comfortable but don’t worry — the first sweater is going to a grateful friend) and using a new Hobbii universe wool version of the one mentioned here. I like it even better! It’s really pricey if you buy just a few skeins but if you buy enough to make the sweater in the size I made it, there’s a bulk price discount that brings it down to less than a dollar a skein difference from the acrylic version.

    April 16, 2021 at 9:32 pm
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